I’ve begun a new knitted artwork that tracks the passing of time and the amount of time invested in creating the work. It has the very original title of How Long Did It Take You to Make That?, No. 2.

This time I’ve cast on 130 sts and am again using a laceweight wool. I’m not limiting myself to any particular amount of time per day or session. I will work on the piece whenever I have the time, or feel like it, and will knit one bead into the fabric for each five minutes of work. It will be done when it’s done.

How Long Did It Take You to Make That?, which I began on February 21, 2009, is finished. I stopped working on it in October, and can’t remember when exactly I bound off. The fabric measures about 6 1/2 inches by 64 inches, spread out.

This artwork addressed the question I’ve been asked so often about my artwork and/or knitting: How long did it take you to make that?

I worked on this piece for five minutes a day, a total of 194 days, or 970 minutes, or a little over 16 hours.

Once a week I changed the needle size, which altered the tension and width of the fabric. Thus, the piece contains within it a visual indication of the passing of time.

I threaded the fabric on a dowel rod and hung it above my bed, along with a grey cotton crochet motif. I’m not sure if the crochet motif is part of the piece or not. (If it is, then add more time to the total, a half hour or so.)

Here’s the progress as of today on How Long Did It Take You to Make That?, which I began on February 21, 2009. This is an ongoing artwork addressing the question I’ve been asked so often about my artwork and/or knitting: How long did it take you to make that?

I work on this piece for five minutes a day, except when I am away from home. I usually work on it in the morning, as part of my meditation practice. As of today, I have spent a little over 15 hours on it.

Once a week I change the needle size, which affects the tension and width of the fabric. In this way, the piece contains within it a visual indication of the passing of time.

It has no practical value and I’m not sure when it will be finished.

Pink Lemonade

July 13, 2009

Pink Lemonade

2009

mohair/silk yarn, repurposed mixed-media collage

9 1/4″ h x 9 3/4″ w

not for sale

This piece is my first effort at making use of the collage fragments that I posted about here. I wanted it to have a kind of homemade calendar look, very low-tech. I think it succeeds in that respect, but I think that grid composition is perhaps too static. I may make a second one, not using a grid, but instead have the collage fragments appear to “spill” downwards from the top and collect in a mass at the bottom. I’ll probably use this fine silk/mohair yarn again, but with larger needles so that the fabric is even looser and more delicate/fragile looking.

Cloud Frock

June 14, 2009

Cloud Frock

2009

wool yarn and repurposed cloud drawing (pencil, colored pencil, and white ink on paper)

8 1/2 inches h x 7 inches w

not for sale

I’ve never known what to do with unsold, failed, unfinished, or never-shown artworks. Pieces I like I hang around my home or I give to friends.  And every now and then I have a studio sale. But as I age, more and more “failed” artworks are taking up space in closets and portfolios. Pieces I never finished, for one reason or another. Pieces I deemed not quite good enough to include in a show. Pieces that I did show, but don’t like anymore.

My current solution for these kinds of artworks is to tear them up and repurpose. For this knitted drawing, Cloud Frock, I tore and cut up an old drawing of a cloud. I think it dates from 2002 and was one of the drawings I decided not to include in a solo show that year at the Center for the Arts in Northampton.

I pierced the drawing fragments with an awl, then worked them into the knitted fabric as if they were beads.

How Long Did It Take You to Make That?

In progress–begun February 21, 2009; this photo shows the piece as of Day 49, April 11, 2009

Materials: laceweight wool yarn

not for sale

The answer as of today is 4 hours, 5 minutes. The piece is about 12 inches long; the width varies depending on the needle size used.


Materials: washers, laceweight mohair/silk yarn, laceweight wool/stainless steel yarn, polyester fiberfill

Dimensions: 4.25″ h x 1.5″ w

not for sale